Iris van Herpen – Seijaku – YouTube

See the evolving genius of futurist Iris van Herpen and her poetic, futurist designs – The collection is entitled, “Seijaku” or finding calm amidst chaos.

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Kiss The Future: The Kinematic Dress

3D printing continues to take small leaps and bounds as adventurers literally spin out innovative adaptations like that of Nervous Systems, Massachusetts  and their kinematically designed frock. Made from over 2200 modular, triangular pieces that move individually allowing fluid, fabric like motion. 21st Century chainmail. So wonderfully innovative that MoMa NYC has bought it to place in their museum. Printed through Shapeways, it involved ‘folding’ the stl. file within the parameters of printing capacity. A remarkable, technological feat that is equally delicate and beautiful.

3D printed-kinematic

Poetry in Motion: Alpha Lyrae

Alpha Lyrae,the latest collection from Vega Zaishi Wang, was recently showcased at Beijing’s Ullens Center for Contemporary Art (UCCA) as part of The Creators Project, a global platform launched by Intel and Vice.She is Beijing based and a 2008 graduate from St. Martins, perhaps explaining the visual link to McQueen and Chalayan. Inspired by a BBC documentary about deep sea creatures—in particular, colorful jellyfish and the magic of bioluminiscence, she utilized EL technology upon advice from her electronic engineer parents. The result makes for some very poetic atmosphere. See more at: Vega Wang



The Goods are Always Greener: Biocouture

An innovative approach to textile technology is unfolding with this technique that harnesses nature’s forces.
“BioCouture is a research project harnessing nature to propose a radical future fashion vision. We are investigating the use of microbial-cellulose, grown in a laboratory, to produce clothing. Our ultimate goal is to literally grow a dress in a vat of liquid…The material is nearest in feel to a vegetable leather and, like your vegetable peelings, it can be safely composted when you no longer want it.”

Suzanne Lee is Director of the project and a Senior Research Fellow at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. She is collaborating with scientists to unite design with cutting edge bio and nano-technologies.

BioCouture is investigating the use of microbes to grow a textile biomaterial. Certain bacteria will spin microfibrils of pure cellulose during fermentation which form a dense layer that can be harvested and dried. To a sugary green tea solution they add a mixed culture of bacterial cellulose, yeasts and other microorganisms to produce a flexible cellulose mat. The bacteria feed on the sugar and spin fine threads of cellulose. As these start to stick together they form a skin on the liquids surface. After two to three weeks, when it is approximately 1.5cm thick, they remove the cellulose skin from the growth bath. They can then either use it wet to mold onto a 3D form, like a dress shape, or dry it flat and then cut and sew it into a garment.
Lee is the author of ‘Fashioning The Future: tomorrow’s wardrobe’ published by Thames & Hudson.http://www.biocouture.co.uk/